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3/01/2015 9:37 am  #1


Eucalyptus saligna, Sidney Blue Gum.

This species doesn't seem quite as robust growing as as the camaldulensis.   Oddly, I've been told it can be fast by others that have it.  Does anyone here have any experience?  I will remind you that my soil is essential, hydrophobic, dirty beach sand. 

http://i60.tinypic.com/alkifa.jpg


April 2014 behind rabbit wire.

http://i62.tinypic.com/2lc1hs6.jpg


Today.


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
 

3/01/2015 5:38 pm  #2


Re: Eucalyptus saligna, Sidney Blue Gum.

FWIW, "walt in lake placid" (florida) had great success with the closely related and similar condition requiring e. grandis---think it grew about 40' in 3 years.  both need relatively good (i.e. relatively deep with some nutrients) moist (but not wet) soil----if your soil is excessively well drained sand with an extremely low nutrient profile than saligna or grandis is likely not going to be happy---especially as a young plant.  might suggest a top dressing of a high nitrogen (no other elements except perhaps trace amounts of iron and magnesium) fertilizer AND a mulch of coarse ground pine bark or melaleuca mulch (to help retain more moisture in the immediate root zone  as well as extra irrigation during any dry spells at least for the first couple of years, and see if that helps.  good luck.


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

3/01/2015 5:59 pm  #3


Re: Eucalyptus saligna, Sidney Blue Gum.

George, I haven't been able to locate seedlings of the E grandis selected for central fl.  Somehow just the Corymbia seem to be available and that's probably do to their better size as a wind break tree for the citrus groves.  I have grandis seed, but was hoping to find one of the university of FL selections so I haven't sowed them yet.  And our soils tend to be dry where the saligna is planted.  I can't believe I sited it and the globulus both so poorly.  Except for the mal-adapted blue gums, I will weed, feed and mulch this spring so they are all ready for our rainy season.  And I keep misidentifying the Corymbia as recemosa when it's torelliana.  I learned it wrong and now it's a mental block, I swear!  The young saligna is very pretty and seems quite healthy, just slow.  It's leathery leaves are a rich dark green, almost like a tropical ficus.


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
     Thread Starter
 

3/01/2015 6:42 pm  #4


Re: Eucalyptus saligna, Sidney Blue Gum.

possibly if the salignas roots can reach down to a moist layer below the (hopefully) shallow dry upper zones it might just take off.  OTOH, it may simply be a bit of transplant shock caused by adverse (dry soil) conditions at the time of planting and the plant may "grow out of it". 
people tend to think of eucalyptus/corymbia/angophora as all being drought tolerant plants when in fact many come from monsoonal climates or evenly spaced percipitation throughout the year or grow naturally in riverine environments and are not drought tolerant at all OR only drought tolerant if rainfall patterns in their planted area at least roughly match their natural habitats.  some are indeed surprisingly tolerant of different conditions---e. camaldulensis generally grows along seasonal or permanent water courses in australia but is very drought tolerant in rather dry hot sites in the central valley of california (with a long hot dry season). 
here in oregon with a distinct summer dry season (3 months) but with rather cool temps thruout the year (where i am at least) a number of different species from more "temperate" parts of australia with at least some rainfall every month of the year (including the gigantic nitens plus delagatensis, scoparia, nova-anglica, ellipitca,etc) generally do very well with no extra water at all after initial establishment---go figure.


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

3/01/2015 9:48 pm  #5


Re: Eucalyptus saligna, Sidney Blue Gum.

The first winter it was frosty here.  The saligna wasn't amused.  The others were fine though the citrodora weren't in the ground.  As dry as it looks in the pix, the real limiting factor is probably the poor soil.  It's been plenty wet for the last 18 months.  Summer 2014 was notable for tons of rain.  At its height, water was standing in the low spots for weeks.  Even recently transplanted things have barely needed supplemental water.  I wish I had been able to see your eucs when I was in town.  I doubt I could grow any of the species that thrive there but I would have enjoyed it all the same.


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
     Thread Starter
 

3/01/2015 10:47 pm  #6


Re: Eucalyptus saligna, Sidney Blue Gum.

hard to say.  some like e. nitens (an extremely fast growing tree closely related to globulus---roughly 70' tall in 14 years) and dalrympleana (almost as big in the same period of time) are likely intolerant of hot humid summers.  others like scoparia (IMHO somewhat similar in appearance to citriodora), nova-anglica, and macarthurii, and deanei (closely related to grandis and saligna) are from northern new south wales and extreme southern queensland and MIGHT be somewhat more accepting of such conditions???


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

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