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3/02/2015 12:35 pm  #1


paulownia fortunei

my plant is finally having a nice bloom after 15 years of otherwise healthy and quick (but mostly flowerless) growth.  sorry that i cannot post pictures but an image search on the web should be able to provide anyone interested with some good (probably way better than i could provide) pictures. the interesting thing is that the flowers are large and creamy white (NOT purple like the common p. tomentosa) with dark spotting inside just like a floxglove and i think that color is distinctive enough to make the plant desirable for our area.  last fall it set a lot of buds and some of them opened then but a lot more are opening now (in the last 3 weeks or so).  the leaves are large and lush and my guess in a hotter summer interior area with some irrigation and/or good deep soil you might have a very attractive shade and flowering tree.  interestingly enough those big leaves decompose very quickly (generally within two months or less) so any mess in the fall is short-lived.  anyone else growing this in our area? 

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon (3/02/2015 12:38 pm)


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

3/02/2015 2:18 pm  #2


Re: paulownia fortunei

I have never grown this, but I have seen it available now and again.  I remember reading up on Paulownia many years ago-- perhaps back in college or even high school-- and thinking P. fargesii was the one to get, but I have no idea why anymore. LOL  Anyway I never found it.  I'm surprised any Paulownia is blooming this early; usually P. tomentosa takes until April but it has been warm.


This is my signature.  I may update it in the future.
 

3/02/2015 3:37 pm  #3


Re: paulownia fortunei

well, there are a number of paulownia species but especially around here p. tomentosa is most all we see.  on the east coast this species is either regarded as a weed or as one of several other species with potential for short rotation high yield timber in plantation settings.  think our "mediterranean" climate with cool wet springs and dry summers is not especially optimal for self-seeding/naturalization so thankfully that's not a big concern here.  the nice thing about this species is the different colored flowers and it's potential as a shade and flowering tree in watered/lawn environments.  like most of the bunch, this species sets flower buds (and under the right conditions may have some bloom at that time as well) in the fall and perhaps with the warm weather we've had so far  this may have stimulated earlier than usual flowering even for this species.  OTOH, both camellia reticulata and acacia dealbata plus several deciduous magnolias are also around a month or more early in flowering at least----we had plants of all of the above blooming for Christmas!!!!  

know of people who have posted on the "other" PNW board who have used the typical species as a "stooled" plant cut back on a regular basis to create a mass of big foliage but i would suggest that if folks have a large enough lawn area and want both shade and flowers in their "specimen trees" that they might look for a paulownia of some sort (especially this tree) and grow it like they would a horsechestnut or catalpa for the hardy but "tropical" look.  BTW and FWIW,, my mature tree has leaves almost 18" long and across on new shoots and interior parts of the crown on a mature tree WITHOUT having to cut it back.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon (3/02/2015 3:58 pm)


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
     Thread Starter
 

3/02/2015 4:55 pm  #4


Re: paulownia fortunei

I FOUND THIS GEORGE AND IT IS  BEAUTIFUL!

http://hozvo.ru/upload/medialibrary/497/%D0%9F%D0%B0%D0%B2%D0%BB%D0%BE%D0%B2%D0%BD%D0%B8%D1%8F.jpg



georgeinbandonoregon wrote:

my plant is finally having a nice bloom after 15 years of otherwise healthy and quick (but mostly flowerless) growth.  sorry that i cannot post pictures but an image search on the web should be able to provide anyone interested with some good (probably way better than i could provide) pictures. the interesting thing is that the flowers are large and creamy white (NOT purple like the common p. tomentosa) with dark spotting inside just like a floxglove and i think that color is distinctive enough to make the plant desirable for our area.  last fall it set a lot of buds and some of them opened then but a lot more are opening now (in the last 3 weeks or so).  the leaves are large and lush and my guess in a hotter summer interior area with some irrigation and/or good deep soil you might have a very attractive shade and flowering tree.  interestingly enough those big leaves decompose very quickly (generally within two months or less) so any mess in the fall is short-lived.  anyone else growing this in our area? 

 

 

3/02/2015 6:07 pm  #5


Re: paulownia fortunei

Rob, yeah the typical "empress tree" has very nice blooms---kind of a "poor man's jacaranda", LOL---but again the plant i have has WHITE flowers (with dark spots inside) so the color effect either as a single tree or as a group would likely be different. 


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
     Thread Starter
 

3/04/2015 1:40 am  #6


Re: paulownia fortunei

That's a picture of Jacarandas, not Paulownias.  They are never that densely flowered or intensely colored.
 

 

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