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3/07/2015 9:38 am  #1


Inspired by Brian in Kirkland: plants that grow in Seattle & Orlando?

My first entry:  Acer rubrum: red maple.  What else can. You list?

Last edited by Keith Winter Haven, FL (3/07/2015 9:40 am)


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
 

3/07/2015 11:06 am  #2


Re: Inspired by Brian in Kirkland: plants that grow in Seattle & Orlando?

quercus virginiana, q. laurina, magnolia virginiana, m. grandiflora,  michelia x foggii, liriodendron tulipifera (?), liquidambar styracifluia (?), , persea palustris and p. borbonia (grows in my garden at least), myrica cerifera, pinus palustris, p. taeda, prunus caroliniana, p. campanulata (and hybrids), trachycarpus fortunei, fatsia japonica, feijoa sellowiana, camellia japonica, c. reticulata, viburnum awabuki (?) aesculus pavia (?). eriobotrya japonica, chamaerops humilis, sabal minor, s. louisiana (possibly others--think a number of sabals have been tried--all seem to require the warmest microclimates to be happy, grow very slow, and are extremely rare outside "plant nut's gardens").  

the list is based in many cases on comparing reference books, range maps, and my own experiences growing many of the plants on the list in a climate very similar---if not identical---to seattle in heat and moisture patterns, and range maps since i haven't had the pleasure of visiting florida in general and orlando specifically.  orlando and environs seems a bit of an anolomy (according to the map in the "southern living garden book") as it appears to have a somewhat warmer climate tha surrounding areas of interior northern and central florida? this list even if it might be SOMEWHAT correct is not exhaustive and am sure that there are other plants that might be in the landscapes (natural or planted) not listed----but hey, i tried and now hopefully you can give more feed back on where i went wrong and maybe suggestions on plants at your end that might do well in both places.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon (3/07/2015 4:54 pm)


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

3/07/2015 3:42 pm  #3


Re: Inspired by Brian in Kirkland: plants that grow in Seattle & Orlando?

Hi Keith. Trachelospermum jasminoides, Clematis armandii are a couple of climbers, and both climates grow evergreen Azaleas, but we each grow different species. There are also lot's of perrenials like Dahlias, Hedochium, Canna's and hardier Musa

 

3/07/2015 4:21 pm  #4


Re: Inspired by Brian in Kirkland: plants that grow in Seattle & Orlando?

sounds that at least in theory (if our suggestions are viable) that there may be potentially a fair amont of plants that can be grown in both places.  that said, some will likely grow better in one place than the orther or at least require somewhat different planting conditions to do well in one place compared to the other---that plant that needs full sun and warmest site here may possilby need a cooler and shadier spot there???

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon (3/07/2015 4:50 pm)


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

3/07/2015 6:06 pm  #5


Re: Inspired by Brian in Kirkland: plants that grow in Seattle & Orlando?

georgeinbandonoregon wrote:

sounds that at least in theory (if our suggestions are viable) that there may be potentially a fair amont of plants that can be grown in both places.  that said, some will likely grow better in one place than the orther or at least require somewhat different planting conditions to do well in one place compared to the other---that plant that needs full sun and warmest site here may possilby need a cooler and shadier spot there???

Hey George. Yeah, I think these climates are so opposite to one another, the real common factor is cold. Some plants happy in the South East garden might grow in a shady nook in a cool part of the garden and thrive, but here they will barely put out new growth in full sun here in the PNW. Sabals being a prime example. They seem to survive just fine, but never seem to thrive. I've seen two or three exceptions near pavement, but it's rare.

On the other hand, we can grow some fantastic Southern Hemisphere gems that are related to purely tropical plants. They can't take humidity, heat or intense sun. Or much cold for that matter.

 

3/07/2015 6:20 pm  #6


Re: Inspired by Brian in Kirkland: plants that grow in Seattle & Orlando?

Brian, think you're right that the climates of seattle (and by extension most of the relatively milder parts of our area) are very different than orlando (and also most of northern and central florida and surrounding areas) even though they may nominally both be labeled USDA 8-9).  their rainfall patterns seem almost exactly opposite and of course they are very much warmer for significantly longer in the "summer" than any part of our area even if the winter temps appear "on paper" to be roughly the same. as the lists seem to show there are some overlap in the plant palettes but (as you mention) there are some cool plants from the southern hemisphere that find our climatic conditions congenial and orlando's not so much and of course other plants from other places that would love orlando and either sulk (like the sabals, LOL) or just plain die sooner rather than later in our tepid dry summers let alone our cool wet winters.  still, it's  interesting  to think about both where our planting lists converge and diverge from each other.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon (3/07/2015 6:50 pm)


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

3/07/2015 9:03 pm  #7


Re: Inspired by Brian in Kirkland: plants that grow in Seattle & Orlando?

George, that's a great list, actually.  I noted a couple plants, Trachycarpus, for example, as well as perseas that don't do well here due to pests (nematodes, ambrosia beetles, etc), not climate.  And we are at the southern end of Liriodendron tulipifera range and they are rarely seen but it does belong on the list.  I think there must be a short list of Junipers too.  What about crape myrtles? 

Brian, those are also good additions. 

I have seen one Lombardi poplar here, but it died a year or so ago.  It was a puny specimen.  What about taxodium distichum?  Does it do well there?


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
     Thread Starter
 

3/07/2015 10:19 pm  #8


Re: Inspired by Brian in Kirkland: plants that grow in Seattle & Orlando?

Keith, glad our "maybe it grows in both places list" was not completely off the mark.  crepe myrtles do pretty good in interior areas with warm summers (willamette valley---portland, salem, eugene for example--- though only just beginning to be used more) not very good in cool summer coastal areas---have never seen one around here for example.  both bald cypress (and metasequoia for that matter) are pretty rare in cultivation here---think we have so many introduced and native evergreen conifers (in my garden i have an araucaria angustifolia, abies nordmanniana, picea pungens, sequoia sempervirens, phyllocladus from new zealand, and a bunch of pines and cypresses from mexico and california among others) that a deciduous type doesn't seem that impressive to most people. as for junipers---don't see them much either as shrubby groundcovers or small trees in landscapes---though they used to be more common.. 

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon (3/07/2015 11:03 pm)


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

3/08/2015 3:10 pm  #9


Re: Inspired by Brian in Kirkland: plants that grow in Seattle & Orlando?

This reminds me of a response I once posted to gardenweb to a person asking if their azalea would grow roots in the winter in Houston. I pointed out that the average temps in Houston in winter were almost as warm as summer temperatures in Scotland, where azaleas also grow and where they can certainly grow their roots in the summer!
 

 

3/08/2015 3:34 pm  #10


Re: Inspired by Brian in Kirkland: plants that grow in Seattle & Orlando?

possibly the azalea roots might indeed grow in winter in houston but FWIW the concern MIGHT be if soil tems become too hot during the summer and possibly kill the plant that way.  that said, proper siting of this particular kind of plant )afternoon shade, mulch around the root zone, good draining soil, some irrigation, etc  may be the difference between success or failure, life or death of this and/or many kinds of plants in houston, orlando, seattle---OR bandon, LOL. 

OTOH, plants can fool you sometimes either in their unexpected toughness and adaptability or what really good cultural practices of water/fertilizer/soil can do to enhance or exceed our expectations.  for example,, most folks regard fatsia japonica as a kind of "shade plant"---especially in hotter summer climates   here on the cool coast it will generally do well in a sunny position (not against a south or west wall, though)   imagine my surprise when i went to Chico, California (a notoriously hot summer place in the northern central valley) and found a large and quite healthy fatsia planted in what appeared to be a rather hot and sunny (afternoon sun exposure) spot---go figure.


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

3/08/2015 6:43 pm  #11


Re: Inspired by Brian in Kirkland: plants that grow in Seattle & Orlando?

"FWIW the concern MIGHT be if soil tems become too hot during the summer and possibly kill the plant that way"

Right, George.  I'm sure it was going to be ok provided she took normal precautions.  In that case she was just a punter who had bought a locally adopted variety at a garden center though...Not Rhododendron augustinii from the RSF! (my R. augustinii from the RSF seemed to have been holding up until 3-4 days ago...fingers crossed that it's ok)

 

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