Hardy Palm and Subtropical Board

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2/28/2015 10:34 am  #1


How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

This genus doesn't act like any plant genus found naturally in the Southeast USA.  I have several eucalypts here in central fl, but they haven't experienced a cold winter yet.


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
 

2/28/2015 11:39 am  #2


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

I would say any experience growing eucalyptus in areas they are not commonly seen is relevant to the discussion here.  We have a few Southeast posters on the old Hardy Eucalpytus Board and on "Cold Hardy Australian Plants" on Facebook.  Thanks for checking it out!


This is my signature.  I may update it in the future.
 

2/28/2015 5:16 pm  #3


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

I have one in my desert garden. It is still young, and I think it is the common fragrant type you see in arrangements sometimes. It gets burned in the low teens for me.


Scot from South Carolina
Greenwood, SC
Zone 8a
Straight from The Palmetto State!
 

2/28/2015 11:06 pm  #4


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

Scot Sounds like Eucalyptus Cinerea "Silver Dollar Gum"   

 

3/01/2015 7:13 am  #5


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

I've seem fairly large (1' diameter trunk, 25' tall) Eucalyptus cinerea in the Chalotte area.  Greenwood should be similar climatically.


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
     Thread Starter
 

3/01/2015 7:27 am  #6


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

Here in Winter Haven, we've planted camaldulensis which seems to be doing well, Sydney Blue Gum (saligna), Blue gum (globulus) ; as well as Corymbia recemosa and, most recently, Corymbia citrodora.  All of these species are doing fairly well though none have experienced anything colder than a 9b low.  By all accounts, the globulus is not well suited, and, to make it worse, they aren't even well sited!  And they are still growing consistently.  We raised the globulus, 1 of 2 camaldulensis, and Sydney Blue from seed.  We purchased seedlings of the others.  We have beaucoup more seed to sew too.  I would like to get my hands on amplifolia.  Some work has been done on that species in North FL and South GA.

Last edited by Keith Winter Haven, FL (3/01/2015 7:33 am)


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
     Thread Starter
 

3/01/2015 11:02 am  #7


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

Keith I think you are right about the name. We are at least a hundred miles south of Charlotte, and according go maps we should be at least a half zone warmer. It seems to be a pretty fast grower.

You can grow tons of neat stuff. I didn't realize there were so many eucs. Anything exotic I try out at my relatives' house in Ft. Myers.

I would like a recommendation for another evergreen euc for my 8a locale. Any ideas?

Last edited by Scot from SC (3/01/2015 11:06 am)


Scot from South Carolina
Greenwood, SC
Zone 8a
Straight from The Palmetto State!
 

3/01/2015 12:58 pm  #8


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

Eucalyptus neglecta will be a real winner!  I had pencil diameter seedlings survive single digits with only minor leaf burn.  Snow gums whine in the summer, but maybe worth a try.  Spinning gum is another worth a try.  I believe it's Latin name is perrina, or something close to that.


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
     Thread Starter
 

3/01/2015 3:57 pm  #9


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

Keith .. Neglecta does great in Colder climates.. usually as a die-back shrub.. in zone 5-6 "Milder winters Zone 7ish it will remain evergreen or at least some degree to that .. Best in Zone 7b-8a to escape any major winter damage .. but even then it can happen .. of course lots of factors are involved with that ! ..
Snow Gum's - Pauciflora.. Alpine Snow gum's -Pauciflora ssp Niphiphila.. Frost Plain Snow Gum - Lacrimans and many others .. Seem to Hate the Humid Hot Summers here ... but if you can get them to some size then the beauty begins .. .. Pauciflora var tiny tots  has done well here .. grows low to the ground .. Lacrimans takes the heat better and also the cold ... Spinning gum - Perriniana does well here as a dieback shrub .. but on those milder winters it may remain a evergreen .. Survives some Zone 7 winters ..Certain  Provenanace details can increase the hardiness or the heat tolerance by a bit 
For Me here in the deep freezer zone 6a    Lacrimans survives the longest but grows slowly here .. which is a good thing for harding up the wood ..  Neglecta and the rest mentioned are about the same .. 0-5 F give or take a few either side .. depends on local conditions and length of the cold ... etc etc etc 

 

3/11/2015 4:03 pm  #10


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

Cincinnati Frank wrote:

For Me here in the deep freezer zone 6a    Lacrimans survives the longest but grows slowly here .. which is a good thing for harding up the wood ..  Neglecta and the rest mentioned are about the same .. 0-5 F give or take a few either side .. depends on local conditions and length of the cold ... etc etc etc 

I have understood that the hardiest type of E. lacrimans grows in Nungar Plain. Is it the same as E. niphophila from Nungar Plain, or are they different species?

Do you know where I can get seed of E. lacrimans and/or E. niphophila from Nungar Plain?

 

3/12/2015 2:25 am  #11


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

In Test Trials I found that Nungar Plain did survive the cold better however on the flip side it  did not like Humid Heat ..as well .. They were even more variable than any of the lacrimans out there currently ... whether or not if there are lacrimans or Niphophila they are truly much more variable in form i have to say again as well as hardiness .. the slow upright form i had was the hardiest ... .. I currently have Lacrimans in the ground from Kiandra Plains and I got on a sowing 2 years ago all reddish stems except one ... We had a horrible winter and the red stem forms are at least 75% damaged while the Yellow stemmed form is about 10 % damaged they are all in the same place in the ground  and have seen -23 C or - 10 F   I do believe they have bunched up Nungar plain form in with all the other Lacrimans .. I have very little Nungar plain seed left .. I will check on how much .. but it wont be much at all .. 

 

3/14/2015 11:40 am  #12


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

Nice testing Frank!  Keep the updates coming on those Eucs!

 

3/15/2015 8:41 am  #13


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

Frank, your working experience in the Midwest is better than anyone I know.  You've been doing it a long time now.  Didn't Tamar Myers post some of your eucs in her Hardy Enough publication?  I read and read those reports and seem to remember eucalyptus at the Cincinnati zoo.


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
     Thread Starter
 

3/16/2015 10:40 am  #14


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

Thanks Keith ... Yes I was in the Hardy Enough publication ... Yes its been well over 25 years now..in testing and Research .. Tim is happy so that makes me happy !  The Research is paying off  .  What ever happened to her ?   

 

3/16/2015 1:09 pm  #15


Re: How do you define a Hardy Eucalyptus?

Frank, I don't know what's happened to Tamar.  I saw her some years ago at a Palm gathering in Charlotte, but not since.  I'm sure that was 10 years ago now.  


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
     Thread Starter
 

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