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3/15/2015 9:36 am  #1


Corymbia torelliana

Here are a few shots of this ever more common tree. 
http://i57.tinypic.com/2epo5uc.jpg

Red new growth

http://i58.tinypic.com/11smonk.jpg

Exfoliating Bark

http://i60.tinypic.com/28apy02.jpg

Muscle Wood


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
 

3/16/2015 11:30 am  #2


Re: Corymbia torelliana

a very nice "euc" that (unlike many of the more common species) really appreciates a wet warm summer.. sorry, if you have already discussed it but have you tried c. maculata?

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon (3/16/2015 11:32 am)


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

3/16/2015 1:07 pm  #3


Re: Corymbia torelliana

Hello George, I haven't tried maculata yet.  I belive I have seed, however.  Need to get some decent potting soil...the garbage from the big box stores just don't cut it.  So, its a long drive up to Orlando where I can buy some.  But time is precious and I haven't made the run.


Professional Horticulturist since 1985.  Grew up near St Louis, MO and never liked winter.  Still don't, even here in Central FL.  At least the palm palette is better!  Our garden Winter Haven is USDA Zone 9a/9b
     Thread Starter
 

3/16/2015 3:43 pm  #4


Re: Corymbia torelliana

interesting, have had fairly good luck starting the seed in "regular" potting soil and in old beach sand as well so go figure!!!  FWIW, the "trick" may be simply putting the seed on top of the soil medium (do not cover) and making sure the soil and seeds stay moist (NOT wet) and warm.  think tha with the warmer temps assume you are having that pretty soon that folks down your way should be able to have reasonable success sowing seed in pots and placing them outdoors.  

BTW, another cool corymbia to consider is c. tessllaris and it's close relative the "ghost gum" c. papuana (maybe selections from central and eastern queensland rather than from the arid central parts).

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon (3/16/2015 3:48 pm)


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

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