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4/14/2015 12:01 pm  #1


"true" mediterranean plants in the PNW (or anywhere else)

there have been multiple discussions (and just plain arguments) about whether the PNW has a true mediterranean type climate or a mild maritime climate with mediterranean moisture patterns---I DON'T wish to discuss this but i am interested in just how many plants from that area (defined as those areas bordering that sea (which includes parts of turkey, the middle east, and north africa as well) are you able to grow in your garden????. 

 


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

4/15/2015 9:03 am  #2


Re: "true" mediterranean plants in the PNW (or anywhere else)

I grow Mount Etna broom - Genista Aetnensis, Atlas or Moroccan broom - Argyrocytisus battandieri, and white Spanish broom - Cytisus multiflorus. The plants and flowers do well in coastal Washington state, but they aren't completely happy since their seeds don't ripen in our cool summers. No invasive plants. Warminsterbroom, Cytisus x praecox does well here. Of course Scotch broom - Cytisus scoparius does very well in the PNW. 

The plant police are terrified of Spanish broom - Spartium junceum, but what I have heard is that it can't handle our artic outbreaks. They are killed, never to return.

Another plant that does very well in the PNW is the tulip.  It is found native in the countries bordering the east end of the Mediterranean.

Besides the European fan palm, I also have an olive tree. It is in a raised bed for fast drainage and seems to be doing well. I don't know if it will ever produce ripe fruit, but that doesn't matter to me.

 

4/15/2015 12:02 pm  #3


Re: "true" mediterranean plants in the PNW (or anywhere else)

yes, think at least some of the other brooms are less liable to become invasive here because they are unable to ripen their seed (which is likely a good thing). think  tulips are kind of a twilgiht zone plants in this discussion as many of the species are apparently not from the med. littoral (some do grow in the area, though) but rather well inland with a semi-arid continental climate of cold (but rather dry winters) and hot dry summers.   that said, tulips wherever they come from seem to like our dry summer climate and if drainage is good they are also fine with our wet winters so they are more adaptable then one might think.  daffodils, crocus, cyclamin, and many kinds of iris OTOH are often med. plants.  

 


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
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