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2/28/2015 5:59 pm  #1


Evergreen Embothrium

I plan on getting as much seed from the four or five trees at the Arboretum as I can. Thier flowers are sooo much more profuse. In my opinion.
http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r141/homernoy/20130519_111642.jpg

 

 

2/28/2015 6:44 pm  #2


Re: Evergreen Embothrium

I've noticed they get more deciduous when they age, in general, but I'm sure genetic variation makes a lot of difference too.  That specimen sure is a stunner.  I haven't been to the arboretum in ages and I certainly haven't had time to get over there in the spring in years.


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3/01/2015 11:07 pm  #3


Re: Evergreen Embothrium

well, some forms of embothrium are (for me at least) are relatively large leaved and evergreen ----"inca flame" for example which is perhaps a selection  of  var. "longifolium" (possibly from the southern coastal regions of chile) while hardier (and more likely deciduous smaller leaved) forms like "norquinco valley" come from interior higher elevation areas in eastern chile and western argentina)---with an interesting range of intermediate forms from areas in-between!!!! 


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

3/01/2015 11:59 pm  #4


Re: Evergreen Embothrium

I had some seeds of 'Inca Flame' once.  I'm not sure what became of them but I would love to try it again.

I also want to retry E. c. var andina.  Will have to see if I have a few seeds still kicking around.  Otherwise I might just have to go to Chile and collect it myself. LOL


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3/02/2015 12:21 am  #5


Re: Evergreen Embothrium

gossler farms in springfield, oregon has (at least last year) had "inca flame" on their on-line catalog.  if you can't find it there contact roger (gossler) and see if they have some "hiding", LOL.  think sacred succulents in sebastapol, california had the andina form of the embothrium (or was it drimys winteri ssp. andina????). 


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

3/05/2015 5:47 pm  #6


Re: Evergreen Embothrium

Ian in Sequim WA wrote:

I've noticed they get more deciduous when they age, in general, but I'm sure genetic variation makes a lot of difference too.  That specimen sure is a stunner.  I haven't been to the arboretum in ages and I certainly haven't had time to get over there in the spring in years.

Hey Ian. This is supposed to be 'Inca Flame' and said to be more evergreen than the much more common (in the PNW) 'longifolium'. That being said, I have no idea if it retains it's leaves here more than any other Embothrium.

But the flowers are soooo much.......... more profuse. 

Last edited by Brian in Kirkland WA (3/05/2015 5:49 pm)

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3/05/2015 6:12 pm  #7


Re: Evergreen Embothrium

well, your mileage may vary with "inca flame'---an exposed site with the potential for cold winds or just plain exposure to cold (windy or otherwise) may make even a nominally "evergreen" plant deciduous.  FWIW, my plant is normally evergreen  except once in a particularly cold winter (temps. below around 18f.) when i think it lost some but not all leaves.  my plant is now about 14 years old and is in a relatively wind protected site.FWIW, .it dodn't start heavily blooming until about 4 or 5 years ago which may be because the plant is a "sucker" from the base of the original named plant and MIGHT conceivably be from the rootstock and thus may not be quite the same as the upper plant (assuming that it might have been grafted rather than grown from cuttings)??? the parent plant would absolutely cover itself with flame colored flowers--gorgeous!!!!


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

3/06/2015 9:26 am  #8


Re: Evergreen Embothrium

Five or six years ago I got a Embothrium from Dragonfly Nursery. The owner told me that she got the orginal plant from Heronswood and that this one suckers. She was not kidding. That plant suckers. I have a T. f. wagernus six feet away that I mulched with aged steer manure that has four suckers from this Embothrium growing around it. The Embothrium from the Washington Park Arboretum that I have which are about fifteen feet tall have never suckered yet. The owner of Dragonfly didn't know what type of Embothrium it is, but looking it up on the Internet the sources I found say that 'inca flame' suckers, It stayed evergreen even during the fall cold event in 2010, but like George says, it suffers when cold and windy. A couple of years ago, it got down to 17° F with high winds. It loss most of its last year's growth. The leaves on the older growth stayed on the tree. The trees from Washington Park Arboretum only loss their leaves.
Of course it hasn't bloomed yet, but do any of you know if this might be an Inca Flame?

 

3/06/2015 9:25 pm  #9


Re: Evergreen Embothrium

it could be "inca flame" or it might be another form of embothrium coccineum var. longifolium (from which "inca flame" might have been selected).  certainly the suckering habit suggests a relationship, think the other characteristics of longer leaves than the "typical" form and generally evergreen leaves (except in the coldest winters/most exposed sites) might point in that direction.  again, embothrium seems extremely varialbe with several "races" with differing degrees of hardiness, leave size and retention (i.e. some are normally evergreen, some mostly decidiuous, and some inbetween dependent on genentics and site conditions).  likely the forms vary from evergreen large leaved somewhat tender plants at low elevations near the coast to more deciduous smaller leaves more frost hardy types at higher elevations in interior locations.   ultimately knowing "exactly" what you have may be a bit of a guess but perhpas not that important as long as whatever you have does well for you???!!!!!


growing plants "on the edge of horticultural sanity".  s.w. oregon coast USDA 9/sunset 5.  grow eucalyptus, acacia, mexican evergreen oaks and pines. 
 

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